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Q & A with the Cast of UGLY LIES THE BONE

Q & A with the Cast of UGLY LIES THE BONE

We caught up with the Cast of UGLY LIES THE BONE to ask them a few questions about the play, and their thoughts on its impact.
Read on for more:

 

WE ARE THRILLED TO CONTINUE OUR 2018 THEATRE SEASON ENTITLED “TO BE HUMAN…” WITH LINDSEY FERRENTINO’S UGLY LIES THE BONE. WHAT EXCITED YOU MOST ABOUT THIS PLAY?

Missy Moore (Jess): What excited me first about UGLY LIES THE BONE is the fact that it is a story about a female army vet.  You just don’t come across these kinds of plays very often. – Missy Moore (Jess)

Jennifer Condreay (Voice/Mom): What first excited you about UGLY LIES THE BONE?  It was not the script in the beginning. It was the chance to return to the Lake Dillon Theatre and perform in this new space!  After reading the script, however, I was immediately struck by this compelling story.  There is an exciting and challenging moment when an actor reads a script for the first time, and realizes that a director entrusts you with that role.

Samantha Rosentrater (Kacie): I spent a good bit of time growing up in and near Florida, so I recognized and was drawn to these characters immediately. People who often never leave their state – never see anything but flat – but most importantly folks who just want to carve out a tiny little piece of happiness in their small corner of their world.

Joel Oramas (Stevie): The first thing that excited me was the language. When I read my character’s lines, there were many ellipsis and interruptions in his thought process, and I connected to his personality, wants and fears very quickly.

Joel Rainwater (Kelvin): Ugly Lies the Bone tackles the issues facing returning combat veterans in a nuanced and humorous way, and it’s great to see it told from a woman’s point of view. Also, Lindsey Ferrintino’s writing is just so damn good. It’s a real tribute to the experiences of our servicemen and women that goes way beyond the often pandering “thank you for your service” sentiment that you so often see portrayed.

IN A FEW WORDS, WHAT IS UGLY LIES THE BONE ABOUT TO YOU?

Moore: Healing and moving forward after a life-altering event.

Condreay: It is a deeply personal story that allows the audience to experience one woman’s reentry to civilian life from the horrors of military service in Afghanistan.  It has no political focus to it and that is what makes it so compelling.  Here is a very tragic event that happened to a veteran, but I do not consider this an “anti-war” play.

Rosentrater: UGLY LIES THE BONE is about connection. About loss – loss of self, spirit, love, community.  It’s about starting over and moving forward.

Oramas: UGLY LIES THE BONE is about a soldier who is severely injured, unrecognizable, and through VR, is yearning to relive her life the way it was.

Rainwater: It’s about the mutual healing that takes place for a vet returning home from Afghanistan and her family.

TELL US ABOUT YOUR CHARACTER IN UGLY LIES THE BONE.

MOORE: Jess is an army veteran who did three tours in Afghanistan and on her third tour she was severely wounded by an IED.  The extent of her wounds qualifies her for an experimental virtual reality therapy which ultimately allows her to live pain free while exploring the virtual world.

Condreay: I am The Voice of the therapist who conducts the Virtual Reality sessions with Jess.  I come from a scientific perspective, instead of the predictable compassionate approach to helping veterans reenter civilian life.  I want the Virtual Reality therapy to be successful; I will move on to the next veteran if Jess’s is not.  I also play the Mom, which ropes in another layer to the story.  Ferrentino manages to tie Jess’s story with other conflicts that families face: sibling issues, caring for aging parents, imperfect romantic relationships, and financial pressures of a failing economy. She does this all in 85 minutes!

Rosentrater: Kacie is Jess’ older sister, an elementary teacher, who chose to stay in her hometown and take care of their mother. She is protective, sweet, and exasperatingly positive. Life has led her to settle a bit – she longs to see something besides Florida. Responsibility has taken over, but glimpses of a fun and carefree spirit peek out from time to time.

Oramas: Stevie is your friendly and quirky convenience store worker who has the best intentions but doesn’t always say the right thing. Although he is sincere, he sometimes uses humor to try to get away from difficult conversations. His fear of leaving his current routine prevents him from seeking greener pastures.

Rainwater: Kelvin is irrationally confident and brash, and he completely lacks self-awareness. He’s also kind of a sweetheart.
WHAT DO YOU THINK WILL SURPRISE AUDIENCES ABOUT THE PLAY?

Moore: The heart of the piece.  You are glimpsing into a life that is struggling but completely infused with magical realism.

Condreay: Audiences will be surprised that they will laugh throughout the play.

Rosentrater: It is bitingly FUNNY.

Oramas: I think audiences will be surprised by the balance of the heavy subject matter and the lighter moments of humor. Upon researching some images from the play, I couldn’t fathom how audiences would be comfortable with the comedic moments.  Playwright Lindsey Ferrentino creates a world where the characters are charming, likeable and relatable enough for audiences to easily connect with.

WHAT DO YOU HOPE AUDIENCES TAKE AWAY FROM UGLY LIES THE BONE?

Moore: That no matter how wounded and broken Jess is, her momentum forward is one of healing and acceptance.  That there is beauty in pain and understanding within the daily struggle to pick the pieces that have shattered her life.

Condreay: In this intimate theatre setting, I am certain that audiences will deeply connect with at least one of the conflicts in the play.  I would be very surprised if they rode home not discussing the experience!

Rosentrater: Our country is surrounded and immersed in trauma and grief right now. This play offers hope. Hope that the possibility of navigating an uncertain future is possible.
Oramas: I hope the audience can see themselves in these characters. The characters all have wants and desires but have too much fear of leaving their current lifestyles in order to achieve them. I believe this is a struggle that many audience members can latch onto in their personal lives and reflect on.

Rainwater: I hope that audiences are moved by the fact that the sacrifice of our armed services personnel often extend far beyond the battlefield. I also hope that they enjoy being introduced to playwright Lindsey Ferrentino, who explores this subject in such a funny and poignant way.